Archive for October, 2016

  1. Cape Sebastian Trail Hike

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 29, 2016

    Cape Sebastian is the northern gateway to some of the least-visited and most scenic portions of the Oregon Coast. Just a few miles south of Gold Beach and the mouth of the Rogue River, Cape Sebastian gives way to the Pistol River area which leads to the spectacular Samuel P. Boardman Scenic Corridor. Much of this coast can be seen from the viewpoint on Cape Sebastian, but the special attraction here is the magnificent trail down to the beach on the north side of the cape.

  2. Safety on the Oregon Coast: Sneaker Waves, Cliffs + More

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Outdoor Project / October 28, 2016

    This article is provided courtesy of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

    Beware The Sneaker Wave and Lurking Log | Dangerous Rip Currents | Tidal Influence | Beware of Cliff Edges

  3. The Tufted Puffin – Oregon Coast’s Most Iconic Species

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Outdoor Project / October 28, 2016

    This article is provided courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  4. Cape Ferrelo Hike

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 28, 2016

    At the southern end of the Samuel H. Boardman State Scenic Corridor are two nice areas to explore: Lone Ranch Beach and the short hike around Cape Ferrelo, one of the best short hikes in the park.

  5. Sisters Rock State Park

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 25, 2016

    Hidden in plain sight is the best description for this spectacular Oregon state park. One of the newest in the state park system, Sisters Rock was acquired using state lottery funds and made a state park in 2005. It remains undeveloped and unmarked from the coast highway, making it less-visited than many others along the south coast.

  6. Otter Point State Recreation Site

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 25, 2016

    Just 3 miles north of Gold Beach and the mouth of the Rogue River, Otter Point is a wonderful little park that has a lot to offer. With two beaches and a spectacularly-carved sandstone point, there is a lot to do in this small recreation site.

  7. Quosatana Campground

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 25, 2016

    Just 14 miles up the Rogue River from Gold Beach, the Quosatana Campground is a real gem of a National Forest campground. Set in an Oregon myrtle grove with broad grass meadows on a bank above the Rogue River, the campground is well-situated for all types of recreation. There is a boat ramp and a large gravel bar to facilitate launching boats as well as a fish-cleaning station for the successful catch. Deer seem to love this area, and they are often seen strolling through the large meadows that border the campground.

  8. Cape Blanco Lighthouse

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 22, 2016

    The year was 1876 when James Langlois arrived at Cape Blanco with his family to be the assistant lighthouse keeper. The Cape Blanco Lighthouse was just seven years old at the time and Langlois would be promoted after another seven years to head keeper, the role he maintained for the remainder of his 42-year career at Cape Blanco. The light has been in mostly continuous service up to today, and it is the oldest standing lighthouse in Oregon. It underwent a major restoration in 2003, and now it is open to visitors April through October several days per week.

  9. Historic Hughes House

    Posted by Outdoor Project Contributor Denis LeBlanc / October 22, 2016

    Patrick and Jane Hughes arrived at Cape Blanco around the time of the Civil War and settled in to make a life in this remote and rugged spot. They raised dairy cattle, farmed the land along the Sixes River, and raised seven children. After 30 years they were able to afford an elegant 11-room Victorian-style house. The Cape Blanco Heritage Society maintains the interior of the home and offers tours to the public. The tour volunteers are excellent and informative.

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